Poison Ivy: Prevention & Relief

Poison Ivy: Prevention & Relief Aug 15, 2017

If you spend time outdoors, then you’ve probably come into contact with poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac at some point in your life. The plants’ oily sap, known as urushiol causes many people to break out in an itchy rash. Urushiol is a colorless or pale yellow oil that exudes from any cut part of the plant, including the roots, stems and leaves.

The intensely itchy rash is an allergic reaction to the sap and can appear on any part of the body. The severity of the reaction varies from person to person, depending on how much sap penetrates the skin and how sensitive the person is to it. The most common symptoms include:

  • Itchy skin
  • Redness or streaks
  • Hives
  • Swelling
  • Small or large blisters
  • Crusting skin when blisters have burst

When other parts of the body come into contact with the oil, the rash may continue to spread to new parts of the body. A common misconception is that people can develop the rash from touching another person’s poison ivy rash. However, you cannot give the rash to someone else. The person has to touch the actual oil from the plant in order to have an allergic reaction.

When to See Your Dermatologist For Poison Ivy

Generally, a rash from poison ivy, oak or sumac will last 1 to 3 weeks and will go away on its own without treatment. But if you aren’t sure whether or not your rash is caused by poison ivy, or if you need treatment to relieve the itch, you may want to visit a dermatologist for proper diagnosis and care. You should also see your dermatologist if the rash is serious, in which case prescription medicine may be necessary. Swelling is a sign of serious infection.

Other signs that your rash may be serious include:

  • Conservative treatments won’t ease the itch
  • The rash begins to spread to numerous parts of the body
  • Pus, pain, swelling, warmth and other signs of infection are accompanying the rash
  • Fever
  • Facial swelling, especially on the eyelids
  • The rash develops on face, eyelids, lips or genitals
  • Breathing or swallowing becomes difficult

To avoid getting the rash caused by poison ivy, oak or sumac, learn how to recognize what these plants look like and stay away. Always wear long pants and long sleeves when you anticipate being in wooded areas, and wear gloves when gardening. If you come into contact with the plants, wash your skin and clothing immediately.

Poison ivy, oak and sumac can be nuisances and often difficult to detect. As a general rule, remember the common saying, “Leaves of three—let them be.” And if you do get the rash, visit our office for proper care.

About Center for Dermatology in Lakeville, Minnesota

The dermatology professionals at the Center for Dermatology are pleased to welcome you to our practice. We provide medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology services in Lakeville, MN. We know how hectic life can be and are committed to making our practice convenient and accessible.

Our health care professionals are qualified, experienced and caring, and we invite you to schedule an appointment for your next skin checkup. We look forward to meeting you!

Call 952-469-5033 Today to Schedule a Dermatology Appointment!

Mon-Thur: 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Fri-Sun: Closed
Lakeville, MN Dermatologist

Center for Dermatology

20520 Keokuk Avenue Suite 104

Lakeville, MN 55044

(952) 469-5033

Our office is located in Lakeville and serves families throughout communities south of the river such as Prior Lake, Farmington, Apple Valley, Burnsville, Rosemount, Elko-New Market, New Prague, Montgomery, Lonsdale, Northfield, Faribault, Shakopee, Eagan and more.